Neuigkeiten

02/07/2020

New Paper published in Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science: Effective design of managed realignment schemes can reduce coastal flood risks.

On 5th September a new paper with the title: « Effective design of managed realignment schemes can reduce coastal flood risks.» will be published in Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science. In this study Joshua Kiesel and our workgroupleader Prof. Athanasios Vafeidis worked with Mark Schuerch, Elizabeth Christie, Iris Möller and Tom Spencer to present the results of a hydrodynamic model application, which was used to analyse the effects of scheme design on within-site high water level attenuation.

The whole paper can be read here.

01/04/2020

New Paper published in Regional Environmental Change: The effectiveness of setback zones for adapting to sea-level rise in Croatia.

On April 1st 2020 a new paper with the title «The effectiveness of setback zones for adapting to sea-level rise in Croatia.» was published in Regional Environmental Change. In this study Claudia Wolff and Prof. Dr. Athanasios Vafeidis worked with Daniel Lincke, Jochen Hinkel, Lukas Blickensdörfer and Daria Povh Skugor to provide the first assessment of the effects of setback zones on future coastal flood impacts on national scale; for this they used the DIVA modelling framework and extended the flood impact and adaptation module of DIVA with models of restricted future development and slow retreat. The whole paper can be read here.

04/03/2020

New Paper published in Frontiers in Marine Science: Effects of the Temporal Variability of Storm Surges on Coastal Flooding

How does the duration of a storm surge affect flood risk? Our new paper in @FrontMarineSci led by Jorid Hoeffken, with @DangendorfSonke, @whsflyngthsthng, where we compare storms with the same peak water level but different durations/intensities. We explore the role of temporal variability of water level for storms with the same peak water level and find differences in flood depth and extent. The influence of temporal variability changes with rising sea-levels. Interesting results from a case study in north Germany: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.00098/full